English medicine in the seventeenth century by A. W. Sloan

Cover of: English medicine in the seventeenth century | A. W. Sloan

Published by Durham Academic Press in Durham .

Written in English

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Places:

  • England

Subjects:

  • Medicine -- England -- History -- 17th century.

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references ( p. 179-204) and index.

Book details

StatementA.W. Sloan.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsR486 .S56 1996
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 215 p. :
Number of Pages215
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL775661M
ISBN 101900838001
LC Control Number97176343
OCLC/WorldCa38305132

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English medicine in the seventeenth century. [A W Sloan] Print book: EnglishView all editions and formats: Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. Subjects: The Pattern of English Medicine -- 2.

Brief Lives of Some Physicians -- 3. The Legacy of Earlier Medicine -- 4. English medicine in the seventeenth century [Sloan, A. W] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

English medicine in the seventeenth centuryCited by:   The 17th century handwritten book is only one of two known copies. It could fetch up to £30, However, the midwife's intervention had done too. This is a major synthesis of the knowledge and practice of early modern English medicine in its social and cultural contexts.

The book vividly maps out some central areas: remedies (and how they were made credible), notions of disease, advice on preventive medicine and on healthy living, and how surgeons worked upon the body and their understanding of what they were : Andrew Wear.

"The Midwives of Seventeenth-Century London is an excellent piece of historical research, illuminating poorly understood issues associated with the history of English medicine in the seventeenth century book and childbearing. In addition, Evenden has provided a valuable and detailed account of early modern English women's paid work." H Cited by: 17th Century.

Harvey to van Leeuwenhoek. 17th century medicine was, unfortunately, still handicapped by wrong ideas about the human body. Most doctors still thought that there were four fluids (or "humors") in the body: blood, phlegm, yellow bile and black bile (pictured right) and illness was believed to result from an excess of one humor.

However, during the 17th century, a more scientific. At the close of the seventeenth century much of practical medicine remained unchanged. Disease as putrefaction was still being evacuated from the body, stories of how illness developed in the body were still being narrated, and anatomy still provided the signposting.

It appears as if the Helmontian alternative had disappeared without trace. Household Medicine in Seventeenth-Century England is an innovative and rich investigation of how domestic and commercial medical care were combined to treat diseases in this period.

She reveals in unprecedented detail the rich currents of information that flowed between individuals and were transferred between generations. It was in the seventeenth century that modern medicine began with the publication of Sir William Harvey's classic text Exercitatio anatomica de motu introduced the scientific method, and medicine had finally and forever ascended from the Dark Ages.

book review Hot Protestants: a history of Puritanism in England and America by Michael P. Winship, New Haven & London, Yale University Press,xiv + pp., £ (hardback), ISBN   This is a major synthesis of the knowledge and practice of early modern English medicine in its social and cultural contexts.

The book vividly maps out some central areas: remedies (and how they were made credible), notions of disease, advice on preventive medicine and on healthy living, and how surgeons worked upon the body and their understanding of what they were doing.5/5(3). This book considers the underlying forces which helped to produce a revolution in seventeenth-century medicine.

It shows how in the period between and medicine came to represent something more than a marginal activity unrelated to social and intellectual phenomena and also how it was influenced and formed by the same developments in religion, politics, science and commerce which.

Exploring the literary remains (diaries, sermons, commonplace books) of Henry Newcome and Philip Henry, both Presbyterian ministers, in the north of England, Harley delivers a forensic examination of the relationships between providential theology in the latter part of the seventeenth century and godly attitudes towards sickness and medicine.

Bibliography of the History of Medicine. Bibliography of the History of Medicine (Print) - Includes journal articles, book chapters, and conference papers and proceedings published from – The Bibliography, a printed version of the discontinued HISTLINE database, was published in six cumulative volumes (), and is useful for pre material.

Wear does not set his book in precisely in these terms; it is rather something of an overview of early modern English medicine. However, one of Wear’s central structuring themes is that continuity, not change, dominated English medicine from the middle of the sixteenth century until the late seventeenth century.

17th century verjuice vinaigrette. In the volume of Good Housekeeping the subject of using verjuice in salad dressings inexplicably crops up.

It takes quotes from the 17th century cook book The English Huswife by Gervase Markham. To illustrate this point, I’d like to focus in on three mid-seventeenth century English surgeons who left detailed surgical case records now housed in the British Library. The casebook of Joseph Binns, a mid-seventeenth century London surgeon, is a valuable window through which one may understand the practice of a legally practicing.

Anne Stobart, Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Exeter, has written an important volume on the complex subject of how health and disease were manageAuthor: Elizabeth Lane Furdell.

“The aim of The English Virtuoso—to provide a new narrative for British art in the s and s by examining the relationship between the arts, empiricism, and medicine in seventeenth-century England—is original and ing a chronological trajectory that charts the medical community’s active interest in the arts, it is gracefully written and brings to light large.

English Benedictine Nuns in Exile in the Seventeenth Century builds upon the prosopographical data of the project, which includes an online database containing over 4, English women who chose exile in a Continental convent between – As such, the book is a showcase of the potential and the merits of the database.

Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (M), or click on a page image below to browse page by by: 1. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

John Locke FRS (/ l ɒ k /; 29 August – 28 October ) was an English philosopher and physician, widely regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and commonly known as the "Father of Liberalism".

Considered one of the first of the British empiricists, following the tradition of Sir Francis Bacon, he is equally important to social contract ion: Christ Church, Oxford. In the first half of the seventeenth century, some Jesuits translated Western medical distillation processes into Chinese.

31 In the s and s, at the request of the emperor, French Jesuits imported to Peking some Western medicinal substances, such as snakestones, theriac, and cinchona, the so-called Jesuit bark, which in was used to Cited by: 2.

Household Medicine in Seventeenth-Century England is an innovative and rich investigation of how domestic and commercial medical care were combined to treat diseases in this period. She reveals in unprecedented detail the rich currents of information that flowed between individuals and were transferred between generations.

In this book, one of England’s most distinguished historians explores the causes and consequences of the English Revolution, the years from to when the triumph of Protestantism encouraged a questioning of authority in English political, economic, social, religious, and intellectual life.

Pop-up books might only seem like a fun, modern way to jazz up a children’s book, but they actually date back to the 11ththose early intricate books weren’t for children Author: Marissa Fessenden. A portal to the Center for the History of Medicine's Dr. Harris Kennedy () presented the Boston Medical Library with some 2, English imprints and dissertations, collected by himself, his father, and his grandfather, comprising the Kennedy Library of English Medical Books.

The holdings range from the 17th century to and. The seventeenth century was a period of remarkable achievement in the field of English poetry: it was the age of Shakespeare, Donne, Marvell, Jonson, Drayton, Herbert, Dryden, and Rochester among others.

Alastair Fowler's celebrated anthology maps the terrain afresh, including innumerable and generous selections from all of the century's masterpieces as well as fascinating work by less. Eighteenth Century Collections Online: Part I. Eighteenth Century Collections Online containsprinted works comprising more than 26 million scanned facsimile pages of English-language and foreign-language titles printed in the United Kingdom between the years and While the majority of works in ECCO are in the English language, researchers will also discover a rich vein of.

Seventeenth century printed books in the National Library of Medicine Series Title(s): NIH publication Author(s): National Library of Medicine (U.S.) Contributor(s): Krivatsy, Peter, Publication: Bethesda, Md.: U.S.

Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Library of Medicine,   Medicine in the 17th and 18th Century book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. THIS 98 PAGE ARTICLE WAS EXTRACTED FROM THE BOOK: Th 4/5(1).

The midwives of seventeenth-century London / Doreen Evenden. – (Cambridge studies in the history of medicine) Includes bibliographical references and index. isbn (hc) 1. Midwives – England – London – History – 17th century. Obstetrics – England – London – History – 17th century.

A History of Seventeenth-Century Literature outlines significant developments in the English literary tradition between the years and An energetic and provocative history of English literature from Part of the major Blackwell History of English Literature series. Locates seventeenth-century English literature in its social and cultural : Thomas N.

Corns. Craig Hanson's plan here consists of drawing a map of the meeting points between the discourses of seventeenth-century medicine and those of artistic representations and antiquarian curiosity, two significant discourses with which medicine came into direct contact, and based on which the portrait of the Early Modern 'virtuoso' was : Francisc Szekely.

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn moreAuthor: David Harley. With the publication of anthologies such as Major Women Writers of Seventeenth-Century England, the serious scholarly advances in this field can become familiar to a larger culture, beginning with the classroom [D]eserves to be widely adopted not only in courses on women writers, but in courses on seventeenth-century literature in general.".

Section Two (for me, the strongest section of the book) explores the resources available for self-help healthcare in a number of seventeenth-century households. Chapter Three uses household accounts to examine patterns of expenditure on medical supplies and : Sophie Mann.

the seventeenth century.7 II At the opening of the seventeenth century the state of medical studies in the universities was such that further reforms were urgently needed. Though facilities for the study of medicine and surgery at Oxford and Cambridge had been increased during the previous century, they were still inadequate.

An influence on the seventeenth century reinforced by Aristotelianism was the intimate relationship between astrology and medicine. Aristotle’s conception of a spherical earth in a spherical universe of finite size, moving according to mechanical plan.

The NOOK Book (eBook) of the English and Catholic: The Lords Baltimore in the Seventeenth Century by John D.

Krugler at Barnes & Noble. Brand: Johns Hopkins University Press.The 17th century was the century that lasted from January 1,to Decem It falls into the Early Modern period of Europe and in that continent (whose impact on the world was increasing) was characterized by the Baroque cultural movement, the latter part of the Spanish Golden Age, the Dutch Golden Age, the French Grand Siècle dominated by Louis XIV, the Scientific Revolution Centuries: 16th century, 17th century, 18th century.Late Seventeenth Century Scientists provides information on the lives and scientific works of scientists who were active in the latter half of the 17th century.

This book discusses the outstanding achievements of physical science in the 17th century.

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